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Mauritiana
Mauritian Ornate Day Gecko
Phelsuma ornata ornata
 

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Phelsuma ornata ornata  
Phelsuma ornata male
 
 

 

Scientific Name

Phelsuma ornata ornata

English Name

Ornate Day Gecko

French Name

Phelsume ornée

Local French Name

Lézard vert

Creole Name

 

Habitat

This species is native to the tropical rainforests and coconut plantations of Mauritios They are flexible in chosing their habitat and have succesfully adapted to cultivated areas.

Geographic Range

Mauritius, Isle aux Aigrettes, Coin de Mire

Status

CITES Protected Appendix II

Overall Length

115 mm


Classification

Kingdom

Animalia

Phylum

Chordata

Sub phylum

Vertebrata

Class

Reptilia

Sub class

Lepidosauria

Order

Squamata (snakes and lizards)

Suborder

Sauria (Lacertilia) - Lizards

Infraorder

Gekkota (Gecko-like)

Family

Gekkonidae (Geckoes)

Subfamilia

Gekkoninae (True geckoes)

Genus

Phelsuma

Species

Phelsuma ornata

Subspecies

Phelsuma ornata ornata (Mauritius)

Phelsuma ornata inexpectata (Reunion Island)

Taxon Description

Gray 1825

Ornate Day Gecko Phelsuma ornata is characterized by its soft skin, bizarre eyes, specialized feet, and brilliant colors. They display striking patterns of greens, blues, yellows, reds, and oranges. This species is one of the smallest reptiles in the world, ranging in length from 1.5 to 2.5 cm. Its tail brakes easily, but will begin to regenerate after only a few days. There is sexual dimorphism. Males are generally more massive.

Ornate Day Geckoes are omnivorous, feeding on insects, nectar, saps, juices and consuming pollen and fruits. They are diurnal (active during the day) and arboreal. The Day Gecko is the most vocal of all geckoes. This species has a wide variety of predators, including snakes and large vertebrae. Its skin, easily torn, can be seen as defense mechanisms against its predators because it allows them to escape.

Females lay one to two eggs, and will hold eggs pressed together with her hind legs until the shells become hard. Afterwards, they attach their eggs to the substrate. Once laid, the female abandons their eggs. Incubation lasts two to three months. Hatchling will reach their sexual maturity in about a year.



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References

Mertens (1963) Senck. Biol. 44: 349-356

Mertens (1963) Mauritius Institute Bulletin, 5:299-305.

Vinson etc. (1969) Mauritius Institute Bulletin, 6:203-320

Mckeown (1996) Field Guide Rept. Amph. Hawaiian Islands.

Rösler (2000) Gekkota 2: 28-153

Rösler (2001) Gekkota 3: 47-73

 

 

Reptiles

 

Lizards

Phelsuma guimbeaui guimbeaui

Phelsuma guimbeaui rosagularis

Phelsuma cepediana

Phelsuma ornata ornata

Phelsuma guttata

Phelsuma guentheri

Phelsuma laticaudata angularis

Phelsuma edwardnewtoni

Phelsuma gigas

Phelsuma borbonica agalegae
 

Snakes

Round Island boa

 

 

Credits

Much of the information and pictures in this page courtesy Rob Huigsloot and his web site www.groenebeestjes.nl


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Links

The EMBL reptile database

www.groenebeestjes.nl

Interessengruppe Phelsuma

 

 

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